Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Phronesis: October 2010, Vol. 56, No. 2

Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Phronesis: October 2010, Vol. 56, No. 2

Article excerpt

Socrates And The Patients: Republic IX, 583c-585a, JAMES WARREN

Republic 9, 583c-585a presents something surprisingly unusual in ancient accounts of pleasure and pain--an argument in favor of the view that there are three relevant hedonic states: pleasure, pain, and an intermediate. The argument turns on the proposal that a person's evaluation of their current state may be misled by a comparison with a prior or subsequent state. The argument also refers to pure and anticipated pleasures. The brief remarks in the Republic may appear cursory or clumsy in comparison with the Philebus, but this appearance is misleading. Rather, they are part of a neat dialectical argument against a potentially troubling set of opponents. Socrates's use of a topological analogy at 584d3-585a7 rounds off this section by clarifying and illustrating his position, preparing the ground for the final explanation of the pleasantness of the philosophical life at 585a-587c.--Correspondence to: jiwl001@cam.ac.uk.

Aristotle on Various Types of Alteration in De Anima II 5, JOHN BOWIN

In De Anima 2.5, 417a21-b16, Aristotle makes a number of distinctions between types of transitions, affections, and alterations. The objective of this paper is to sort out the relationships between these distinctions by means of determining which of the distinguished types of change can be coextensive and which cannot, and which can overlap and which cannot. …

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