Academic journal article Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

Editor's Page

Academic journal article Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

Editor's Page

Article excerpt

Through the leadership of Stuart Wittenstein, chair of the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness (JVIB), the journal features a series known as This Mattered to Me in which Dr. Wittenstein invites leaders of the field to identify something they read in JVIB that had a long-lasting impact on them and to share their story with readers. The highlighted classic article is then posted online for all subscribers to read, and it becomes part of the JVIB Online electronic archive of literature. This month, I actually did a double take when I saw the author of the article recommended in This Mattered to Me as T. S. Eliot, a famous poet, playwright, and literary critic, and considered by many to be one of the most important English-language poets of the 20th century. Although the essay is about braille, I read it as a story about literacy, with braille as one medium. Not wishing to steal the story as told by Sheila Amato, I will divulge no further details other than to say that her This Mattered to Me is a must read for anyone who loves a good story and the tenderness with which it is told. Quite frankly I cannot wait until the T. S. Eliot piece from 1952 is available online so I can read it myself.

The lead article by Capella-McDonnall addresses the chronic problem of finding employment for individuals with visual impairment, and she uses data from the second National Longitudinal Transition Study to predict employment outcomes. As is true with most of life, early experiences with work and level of educational attainment are important predictors, and transportation, independent travel skills, and social skills also ranked high among all of the variables that were studied.

Educational research in the field of visual impairment has gradually shifted from being primarily concerned with students' access to general education schools and classrooms to a greater focus on the access of students with disabilities to the educational curriculum. As it turns out, this is an issue with many challenges. …

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