Academic journal article Science Scope

Creating an Inner Glow

Academic journal article Science Scope

Creating an Inner Glow

Article excerpt

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have developed the first fluorescent protein that enables scientists to clearly "see" the internal organs of living animals without the need for a scalpel or imaging techniques that can have side effects or increase radiation exposure. The new probe could prove to be a breakthrough in whole-body imaging--allowing doctors, for example, to noninvasively monitor the growth of tumors in order to assess the effectiveness of anticancer therapies. In contrast to other body-scanning techniques, fluorescent-protein imaging does not involve radiation exposure or require the use of contrast agents.

For the past 20 years, scientists have used a variety of colored fluorescent proteins, derived from jellyfish and corals, to visualize cells and their organelles and molecules. But using fluorescent probes to peer inside live mammals has posed a major challenge. The reason: Hemoglobin in an animal's blood effectively absorbs the blue, green, red, and other wavelengths used to stimulate standard fluorescent proteins along with any wavelengths emitted by the proteins when they do light up.

To overcome that roadblock, the laboratory of Vladislav Verkhusha, associate professor of anatomy and structural biology at Einstein, engineered a fluorescent protein from a bacterial phytochrome, the pigment that a species of bacteria uses to detect light. …

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