Academic journal article The Hastings Center Report

Laughter in the Best Medicine

Academic journal article The Hastings Center Report

Laughter in the Best Medicine

Article excerpt

I want caregivers who are solid, well-rounded, well-grounded people and who relate well to other people. That probably means they have a pretty good sense of humor. I would also expect any doctor with a sense of humor sometimes to find humor in some of the more difficult aspects of patient care, and even to make jokes about very serious things--about tragedies, poor prognoses, deaths. Humor can also be put to good use in human interactions--it's not just something I'd expect to see in normal, healthy human interactions; it can be an exceptionally powerful tool for moving a conversation forward, and for bringing people in the conversation together. But of course, it has to be used properly. I don't want my doctor to ridicule me.

This is the topic taken up in this issue by Katie Watson, an ethicist and sometime comedian. Specifically, Watson asks if doctors may ever engage in gallows humor--humor that makes light of difficult situations--and if they sometimes may, then when may they, and what kinds of jokes are acceptable? Watson offers some considerations for sorting out acceptable from unacceptable joking, but for me, what is compelling about the article is less its effort to bring order to a somewhat puzzling aspect of human interaction, but its acceptance of the complexity of human interaction and the difficulty of fully ordering it--even of fully understanding it, even when it's right in front of you. Watson leads off with an example of medical gallows humor and concludes by applying her list of considerations to it, yet the conclusion she reaches has a tentative feel: we are on "thin ice," she allows. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.