Academic journal article Education

English, German and French Language Instructor Training Systems in the Admission Process to the European Union

Academic journal article Education

English, German and French Language Instructor Training Systems in the Admission Process to the European Union

Article excerpt

Introduction

Problem

The main issue of this study may be expressed in a single sentence as follows: "What type of developments do the English, German and French language instructor trainings in Turkey display in this process of admission to the European Union?"

Purpose

The purpose of this study is stated below: "To study the importance and advancement of the English, German and French language instructor trainings in Turkey within this process of admission to the European Union?"

Method

The research method applied in this study is the scanning of the concerning literature. In this method, any and all national and international postgraduate and doctorate dissertations, book, articles, statements and various works have been examined and a collective synthesis is created.

European Union and Turkey

Among the ideas that were generated in order to preserve the peace and stability in Europe after 1945, following the I. And II. World Wars, the integration of Europe stood out the most. For this purpose, Federal Republic of Germany, France, Italy, Netherlands, Belgium and Luxemburg established the European Coal and Steel Community with an agreement they signed in Paris and following this, France, Germany, Italy, Belgium, Luxemburg and Netherlands established the European Community (EC). Later on, England, Ireland, Denmark, Spain and Portuguese also joined the European Community (Gedikoglu, 2005).

As a result of the Maastricht agreement in 1992, which was a highly important cornerstone in the integration of Europe, the members of the European Community officially established the European Union (EU).

The European Union has 4 main objectives (Dura and Atik, 2003):

1) Creating the "European citizenship" concept (basic rights, freedom of movement, social and political rights etc.),

2) Securing freedom, safety and justice (cooperation concerning Justice and Internal Affairs),

3) Supporting the economic and social development (Single market, Euro, Regional development etc.),

4) Making Europe an important force in the world.

The European Union gravitated towards expansion efforts following the Copenhagen Summit which took place in 1993. However, an important but limited and problematic approach was put forth at the Luxemburg Summit which took place in 1997. With this approach and as a result of the conservative opinions dominating the EU, adopted a narrow and exclusionist approach that adopted the geographical and cultural-religious limits of the expansion (Eralp, 2003). However, the Helsinki Summit held in 1999 opposed the borders of the EU being based on geographical and religious-cultural elements, adopted a more inclusive point of view based on cooperation and economic-political values and put forth a new approach concerning Turkey's position. Within the scope of this approach, Turkey was accepted as a candidate country for the expansion process.

In 1995, with the admission of Finland, Austria and Sweden, the number of European Union member states became 15. In the 2002 Copenhagen EU Council Summit, the admission dates of 10 candidate countries to the European Union have been determined as May 1, 2004. The date determined fort he membership of Bulgaria and Romania was 2007. At the European Council meeting held in Brussels on December 17, 2004, it was agreed that the talks with Turkey among the candidate countries were to be initiated.

The Turkey-EU relationships have a history of 40 years. Turkey applied to the ECC in July 1959 and according to the agreement signed in Ankara in the year 1963, the full membership process had been determined as three levels:

1) The preparation period,

2) The transition period,

3) The final period.

1) Preparation Period, During this period which was envisaged to be 5 years but lasted 8 years between December 1, 1964 and December 31, 1972, as a result of the prolonging of the negotiations. …

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