Academic journal article Canadian Journal of Education

Student and Teacher Self-Efficacy and the Connection to Reading and Writing

Academic journal article Canadian Journal of Education

Student and Teacher Self-Efficacy and the Connection to Reading and Writing

Article excerpt

Abstract

Self-efficacy or the belief in one's ability (Bandura, 1977) on the part of both teachers and students is thought to be directly related to teacher and student success. Few studies have compared teacher efficacy, student efficacy, and student ability at once. This study examined the relationship between teacher self-efficacy, student self-efficacy, and student ability. Teachers' perceptions of the students' self-efficacy was significantly correlated with students' abilities; however, student literacy self-efficacy was not correlated with their literacy ability. Additionally, there was no correlation between the teachers' perception of the students' literacy self-efficacy and the students' literacy self-efficacy. Finally, the teachers' self-efficacy was significantly correlated with their perception of the students' self-efficacy.

Keywords: self-efficacy, reading, writing, elementary

Resume

L'auto-efficacite ou la croyance en sa capacite (Bandura, 1977) de la part de l'enseignant autant que de l'eleve est consideree comme etant directement liee a la reussite de l'un comme de l'autre. Peu d'etudes ont compare en meme temps l'auto-efficacite de l'enseignant, celle de l'etudiant et les competences de ce dernier. La presente etude examine le rapport entre ces trois concepts. On a decouvert une forte correlation entre la perception de l'enseignant de l'auto-efficacite de l'etudiant et les competences de l'eleve. Par contre, en matiere de litteratie, il n'existait pas de correlation entre l'auto-efficacite et competence, pas plus qu'entre la perception de l'enseignant de l'auto-efficacite de l'etudiant et la realite. Enfin, rauto-efficacite de l'enseignant est significativement correlee a sa perception de l'auto-efficacite de ses etudiants.

Mots-cles: auto-efficacite, lecture, ecriture, elementaire

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Literacy instruction has been, and continues to be, the subject of much controversy in education. Supporting the development of basic literacy skills in students is one of a teacher's most important jobs. Research has repeatedly demonstrated that teachers may be the single most important influence on a child's reading and writing development. In addition, schools today are expected to educate larger numbers of children to increasingly higher levels of reading and writing proficiency. In the current educational and political climate where millions of dollars are being spent on early literacy intervention, it is extremely important to investigate teacher and student beliefs with respect to literacy.

Students' literacy is influenced not only by their cognitive ability, but also by nonintellectual variables such as the student's belief that he/she is capable of successfully performing a task (i.e., self-efficacy). The self-efficacy students have in their ability to accomplish a task determines how much effort they initiate and the extent to which they persist when faced with obstacles and adverse situations (Bandura, 1977; Kim & Lorsbach, 2005; Tschannen-Moran & Hoy, 2001). If students do not persist in activities that they perceive as threatening, they will maintain their debilitating expectations and fears, which may eventually lead to a state of learned helplessness (Bandura, 1977; Chapman, 1988; Kim & Lorsbach, 2005). Teachers may play an important role in the formation of student self-efficacy and achievement. While self-efficacy on the part of both teachers and students is thought to be related directly to teacher and student success, the comparison of teacher efficacy, student efficacy, and student ability within the confines of a single study has been relatively unexplored. This study examines the relationship between teacher self-efficacy, student self-efficacy, and student ability.

Since self-efficacy may influence academic achievement, teachers' ability to directly address a student's self-efficacy can have as great an impact on student performance as direct skill/knowledge instruction. …

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