Academic journal article International Journal of Sports Marketing & Sponsorship

The Influences of Perceived Brand Quality and Ethnocentrism on Consumption Patterns of a Global Sports Brand: The Case of Korean College Students

Academic journal article International Journal of Sports Marketing & Sponsorship

The Influences of Perceived Brand Quality and Ethnocentrism on Consumption Patterns of a Global Sports Brand: The Case of Korean College Students

Article excerpt

Executive summary

Many corporations have now adopted global marketing approaches to their branding strategies. Among the many known commercial benefits of globalisation, is the opportunity for companies to develop and profit from the image of global brands (Zhou et al, 2008). Consumers' different perceptions and personality systems associated with global brands may, however, create different brand value and utility, influencing their brand equity (Aaker, 1996; Keller, 1993). Strong brand equity may attract more consumers and eventually increases revenues by influencing their purchase intentions (Bauer et al, 2005; Richelieu & Pons, 2005).

In order to better understand sport fans' consumption behaviour relating to a global sports brand, this study assessed the mediation effect of perceived brand quality (PBQ) and the moderation effect of consumer ethnocentric tendency in the proposed consumption model of a global sport brand (i.e. the English Premier League). The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to examine how consumers' PBQ mediated the relationship between perceived brand globalness (PBG) and watching intention; (b) to examine how different levels of ethnocentrism moderated the relationship between PBG and watching intention.

Data were collected from 302 college students in the Republic of Korea. A total of 10 items adapted from previous literature were utilised to measure the four psychological and behavioural constructs. For hypotheses testing, a structural equation modeling was employed. In the phase one, the mediation effect of PBQ was tested. Two competing models (i.e. partial and full mediation models) were considered based on the conflicting results from literature review (Alden et al, 1999; Shocker et al, 1994; Steenkamp et al, 2003). The study conducted a [chi square] difference test to determine whether the additional path between PBG and watching intention significantly improved the overall model fit of the partial mediation model. In the phase two, the moderation effect of ethnocentrism on the relationship between PBG and watching intention was tested. First, median-split samples of high and low ethnocentric groups were constructed. Next, as a prerequisite condition, an independent sample t-test was used to test mean differences of ethnocentrism between two groups. Lastly, two structural equation modeling tests were conducted to test overall and internal model fit as well as the hypothesised relationships.

Results showed that PBQ partially mediated the relationship between PBG and watching intention, and ethnocentrism played a moderating role in this relationship. This study found that PBG did not influence watching intention in the high ethnocentric group, whereas PBG directly and positively influenced watching intention in the low ethnocentric group.

More importantly, there was no direct impact of PBQ on watching intention in the low ethnocentric group. It indicates that when low ethnocentric consumers perceive globalness of the EPL, they would likely watch the league, which would compromise the effect from its quality.

Given the current results sport marketers need to consider various strategies that can create and deliver global images of professional sports leagues for maximising their consumptions. It should also be noted that different consumer segments may be motivated by different aspects of a global brand.

Introduction

Globalisation is one of the hottest issues in contemporary society and many corporations have adopted global marketing approaches to their brand strategies. Among many known benefits of globalisation is the fact that companies are seeking to profit from the image of global brands (Zhou, Teng, & Poon, 2008). The global image of a brand often leads consumers to choose the brand over local alternatives even when its quality and value are not objectively superior (Steenkamp, Batra, & Alden, 2003). …

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