Academic journal article Australian Journal of Education

Editorial

Academic journal article Australian Journal of Education

Editorial

Article excerpt

This Special Issue of the Australian Journal of Education focuses on the newly released Australian curriculum. I am very grateful to Bill Atweh and Parlo Singh for their willingness to undertake roles as Guest Editors, and for the enthusiasm and expertise that they have brought to the task. Their commitment was to seek out authors who could contribute to this Special Issue through their particular expertise in each of the four discipline areas for which curriculum development has progressed to the beginnings of the implementation phase (English, mathematics, science and history), and on the basis of expertise and experience in curriculum theory and educational policy.

They have honoured this commitment. Their work as editors has been guided by a single key principle. They wanted to generate a space in which leading educational researchers contributed to the ongoing educational exchange about the national curriculum project. They recognised the publication of the Australian curriculum in 2011, to be trialled in schools over the next two years, as a landmark in the continuing conversations about what constitutes valued and valuable knowledge for young people. The collection of articles that has resulted presents a range of different theoretical perspectives and identifies many issues that remain hotly debated.

Overall, the articles collected in this Special Issue show that there continue to be significant concerns around the current form and content of the Australian curriculum. Many of these concerns have been raised previously during the consultation phases of the national curriculum project (see the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority website, ).The consultation process involved the active engagement of key stakeholders such as, academics, subject or discipline associations, unions, teachers' professional groups, principals' associations, parents' organisations and industry groups over the different stages of curriculum development--'The shape of the Australian curriculum', 'The framing of the Australian curriculum' and finally 'The Australian curriculum'. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.