Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

The Three Key Literacies: Curriculum Expert Heidi Hayes Jacobs Offers a Clear and Practical Approach to Upgrading Standards-Based Curriculum for the 21st Century

Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

The Three Key Literacies: Curriculum Expert Heidi Hayes Jacobs Offers a Clear and Practical Approach to Upgrading Standards-Based Curriculum for the 21st Century

Article excerpt

HEIDI HAYES JACOBS, the founder and president of Curriculum Designers, executive director of the National Curriculum Mapping Institute and Academy, and author of the groundbreaking "Curriculum 21: Essential Education for a Changing World," will be a featured keynote speaker at FETC 2012. T.H.E. Journal recently sat down with Hayes Jacobs to discuss why educators must embrace curriculum reform, the impact of the Common Core State Standards, and her goal for the future of K-12 education.

T.H.E. Journal: What inspired you to develop the curriculum plan you set forth in "Curriculum 21?"

Heidi Hayes Jacobs: In teaching and curriculum design, my focus has always been on choices. It's always been that we, as educators, should be making astute and responsive choices that prepare our students for the future. Unfortunately, it's become clear that the future that many schools are preparing their students for is 1980. Ten percent of the 21st century is over; the question now isn't "whether to," it's "how to." The plan I developed gives teachers and educators a handle on how to reinvent, reboot, and replace aspects of what they teach, and how to modernize and upgrade their curriculum.

T.H.E.: How did you identify and develop your three key literacies for 21st century learning?

Hayes Jacobs: While researching and writing "Curriculum 21," I worked with teachers to explore and identify key areas of instruction that educators should focus on once they've made the choice to upgrade their curriculum. It was immediately clear that new points of articulation and meaning-making had emerged that required students to have the ability to take some of the great classical traditions of print literacy and apply them to new forms of accessing information and articulating response.

There seemed to be three related but distinctive toolsets--digital literacy, media literacy, and global literacy--that had become key in helping students navigate through the curriculum that they need to master and the investigations that they need to make in order to prepare themselves for right now, let alone for what they'll face 15 years from now when they're going to be in the workplace.

T. …

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