Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Mobile Technology Changes the Game: As Schools Start to Place Mobile Technologies in the Hands of Every Student, the Traditional Use of the Classroom PC Is Waning. Education Technology Consultant Brent Williams Talks about the Challenges Ahead and Why This Is in Everyone's Best Interest

Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

Mobile Technology Changes the Game: As Schools Start to Place Mobile Technologies in the Hands of Every Student, the Traditional Use of the Classroom PC Is Waning. Education Technology Consultant Brent Williams Talks about the Challenges Ahead and Why This Is in Everyone's Best Interest

Article excerpt

LIKE THE CARTRIDGE pen and the ditto machine before it, the traditional PC's best days in the classroom may be over.

"I think we've finally established that we're not going to get any gains in SAT scores, or whichever kind of test scores you want to look at, by putting two or three PCs in the classroom," says Brent Williams, the director of the iTeach Center at Kennesaw State University near Atlanta. "It hasn't worked."

Williams, who also serves as an education consultant specializing in emerging technologies, is a firm believer that the new standards in personal computing--namely smartphones and tablets--are leading education in a bold and irreversible new direction.

"What we do know is that when we put technology in the hands of every kid, kids use it, they get excited about it, and I think there's great hope that we will actually see some improvement in teaching and learning as we make this shift away from the sort of boat anchor PC," he says.

Williams will expand upon his visions for technology in the classroom during his upcoming presentation, "A Real Paradigm Shift," on Jan. 25.

Before real change can occur, however, schools will need to find a way to get teachers as excited over mobile technologies as their students, which will undoubtedly require laying some groundwork. "The main thing is teacher training," Williams says. "That is the one thing that has got to occur.... Don't just tell them how to do it, show them."

Right now there are a few different ways that could play out: Schools can plan group training sessions during vacations or summer breaks, or they can invite trainers to observe classrooms individually and provide feedback.

Students---likely to be already ahead of the curve when it comes to using this technology--can also take the lead, allowing teachers to focus on learning, not tech support. "Kids can be a great help to each other," Williams says, "and, as we know, they typically are. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.