Academic journal article Journal of Tourism Challenges and Trends

Destination Development in Amritsar-A Regional View of Peripheral Attractions

Academic journal article Journal of Tourism Challenges and Trends

Destination Development in Amritsar-A Regional View of Peripheral Attractions

Article excerpt

Introduction

Attractions have long been considered a cornerstone of tourism, representing the collection of resources that attract tourists to an area or region, and a fundamental component of tourism development (Gartner, 1996; Gunn, 1994). Therefore, attractions are a catalyst for travel and tourism industry, creating opportunities for the development of transport, accommodation, tours/ guides, souvenirs production (Sharpley, 2006). Tourist attractions provide reasons to tourists to visit a place, attend an event, or travel to a location for the purposes like recreation, enjoyment, education and information gathering or intellectual hobbies or searches. So, attractions, along with transport and accommodation, are inarguably the most important component in the tourism system, providing a pleasurable experience and satisfaction to tourists, as well as an appropriate level of services (Heron & Stevens, 1990). These are important both at and en route to a destination. Swarbrooke (1995) distinguishes between attractions and destinations as--attractions are, generally, single units, individual sites or very small, easily delimited geographical areas based on a single key feature. The development of individual sites is connected to and dependent on four components of a destination zone: attraction complexes, service community, transportation and access, and linkage corridors (Gunn, 1997). Cooper et al. (1993) summarise "destinations" as the defining tourism geographic unit. It is at the destination where all aspects of tourism come together--demand, transportation, supply and marketing. The components of the destination include: attractions (both human-made and natural features); amenities; access; and ancillary services (promotion, industry organization). A tourist destination may consist of more than one spot of tourist interest. It means a destination is a place of consumption with a certain image, where a person can enjoy services and acquire material products that, considering a better or worse organisation, will transmit a certain perception of the territory (Vera, 1997). These can be the core area or the peripheral part of the main attraction.

Literature review

Peripheral areas

Peripheral areas, situated far away from the main attraction, are mainly dominated by the rural tourism and attractions. In a sense peripheral areas provide a taste of country life and can be developed by designing tourist circuits. These place nature-based tourism in a wider regional context, particularly when for many peripheral regions, tourism remains one of the key opportunities for economic development. Therefore, the central theme is that nature-based tourism can play as the catalyst for larger regional development of regions (Hall & Boyd, 2006). Peripherality is more than merely a geographical notion. In modern parlance, to describe something as peripheral is often to dismiss it as unimportant, of no interest to the majority and of no significance to world events (Hall & Brown, 2006). Blackman (2004) identifies a number of factors which act as barriers to successful tourism development in the peripheral region including a lack of control over negative impacts, difficulties with finance, community opposition and a lack of infrastructure. Weaver (1998) presents the impact of tourism on the differences between core and peripheral areas in the Caribbean region. Nuur (2010) feels many peripheral regions in Sweden are today struggling to survive in a completely changed economic landscape, with new conditions for development. Vogt (2008) in research on the Piedmont Alps (Italy) concludes that tourism is suitable as an instrument for regional development of rural peripheral regions only if, exogenous actors such as public authorities assume certain responsibilities and they must possess both resources (individual resources are more important than financial ones), and preferences for particular actions. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.