Academic journal article Strategic Review for Southern Africa

Editorial Comments

Academic journal article Strategic Review for Southern Africa

Editorial Comments

Article excerpt

This issue of Strategic Review for Southern Africa covers a range of topics and issues related and important to African security and strategic affairs and to the way in which we think and theorise about these issues.

The past year has witnessed a renewed interest in South Africa's foreign policy, based primarily on the country's draft white paper on foreign policy (published in May 2011), its second term as a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council and its membership of the BRIC-grouping (now BRICS). Deon Geldenhuys' article ('Dealing with deviants') explores South Africa's relations with so-called deviant states against the background of the country's stated commitment to the promotion of democracy and human rights. Geldenhuys concludes that there is sufficient evidence to show that South Africa has adopted a more critical approach to several of these 'deviant' states and that it has begun to play a role that is more consistent with demands of 'good international citizenship'.

Heidi Hudson, in her article, 'Inhabitants of interstices?', underlines the critical role that Feminist Security Studies plays in the theorising of security, despite operating 'on the margins of mainstream International Relations'. Hudson argues that the various security discourses should become more reflective of their normative assumptions and political commitments and her article makes a valuable contribution also to the way in which academics and practitioners engage in debates regarding the issue of 'gender' in real life instances of policy and project design and implementation.

In their article on the risk of humanitarianism, Pringle and Lambrechts develop an industry-specific political-security risk model for international agencies in conflict zones, addressing the limitations faced by such agencies in conducting effective strategic risk assessments. Their model aims to select and incorporate the appropriate factors and indicators that would enable international agencies to mitigate the risks encountered in conflict zones.

Leon Hartwell's article critically assesses the 'bold proclamations' by the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank about the resilience of African economies to deal with the current global financial crisis, an attempt, the author says, to justify their economic policy prescriptions as having been successful. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.