Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: January 2012, Vol. 84, No. 1

Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: January 2012, Vol. 84, No. 1

Article excerpt

In Defense of the Phenomenal Concept Strategy, KATALIN BALOG

In this article, the author discusses the phenomenal concept strategy. According to the author, on the constitutional account, there is an intimate relation between phenomenal concepts and their referents. She also proposes that token experiences serve as modes of presentation for the phenomenal properties that they instantiate.

Cognitive Penetration of Colour Experience: Rethinking the Issue in Light of an Indirect Mechanism, FIONA MACPHERSON

In this article, the author proposes a two-step mechanism of indirect cognitive penetration that explains how cognitive penetration may occur. She proposes that there is one potential counterexample to the cognitive impenetrability thesis that is not persuasively explained away by the usual strategies. She also claims that the second stage of the mechanism occurs in humans.

Resultant Luck, CAROLINA SARTORIO

This article discusses the concept of resultant luck. According to the author, resultant luck makes use of two important notions: the notion of being in control of an outcome and the notion of being morally responsible for an outcome. She further claims that the resultant luck is moral luck, which is about the results or consequences of acts.

A Dual Aspect Account of Moral Language, CAJ STRANDBERG

It is often observed in metaethics that moral language displays a certain duality in as much as it seems to concern both objective facts in the world and subjective attitudes that move to action. In this paper, the author defends The Dual Aspect Account, which is intended to capture this duality: A person's utterance of a sentence according to which [??]ing has a moral characteristic, such as "[??]ing is wrong," conveys two things: The sentence expresses, in virtue of its conventional meaning, the belief that [? …

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