Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Optimizing Insecticide Resources: Global Trends in Vector Control

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Optimizing Insecticide Resources: Global Trends in Vector Control

Article excerpt

Although insecticides have helped lower worldwide rates of infectious disease, the use of these chemicals must be monitored and controlled to avoid pest resistance and minimize associated risks to human health and the environment. Researchers have conducted a comprehensive assessment of trends in the global use of insecticides for vector-borne disease control over the last decade and found that the potential for overuse of pyrethroids could result in a loss of the effectiveness of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LNs), which have been one of the most successful tools for controlling malaria to date [EHP 120(4):577-582; van den Berg et al.].

The research team analyzed data from 125 countries that used organochlorines, organophosphates, carhamates, and pyrethroids for vector control between 2000 and 2009. Application methods were classified as residual spraying (spraying interior and peripheral surfaces of houses), space spraying (spraying exterior spaces), treatment of nets (not including factory manufacturing of LNs, which contain pyrethroids), and larviciding (treating aquatic breeding sites of mosquitoes with insecticides). The team conducted 2 analyses of insecticide use for each country, covering a 10-year and an annual average.

The main diseases targeted by insecticide use were malaria, dengue, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease. The organochlorine DDT was by far the most used insecticide in terms of quantity (71%), with India accounting for most applications (82%) and African countries accounting for the rest. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.