Academic journal article ABA Banking Journal

Fruitful Diversion: Iowa CEO Knows Good Things Come to Those Who Wait

Academic journal article ABA Banking Journal

Fruitful Diversion: Iowa CEO Knows Good Things Come to Those Who Wait

Article excerpt

When Jay Randall isn't punching numbers, he may be pushing corks into bottles.

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For the past six years, the CEO of the $98 million-assets Community Bank of Dunlap, Iowa, has been making, drinking, and sharing his own wine. "I got into winemaking because my wife and I started enjoying drinking wine," says Randall, who took his enjoyment a step further when he joined the Schleswig Wine and Bier Club, based in the nearby western Iowa town of Schleswig.

The club has been meeting for almost 40 years, and offers enthusiasts the chance to sample different wines and discuss the winemaking process. It was here that Randall discovered the art of home winemaking and became hooked.

After an initial investment in some equipment, Randall began buying wine kits, which include a pre-packaged bag of concentrated juice, a set of instructions, and the necessary chemicals for fermentation.

In a bucket with an air-lock lid, Randall mixes these contents with water in his kitchen and then leaves the mixture to ferment for a week in his basement. He then transfers the juice into a carboy (a glass or plastic jug)--leaving the sediment that has settled at the bottom of the bucket. This "wait and transfer" process repeats until the sediment is gone and the wine is clear.

Randall also makes wine from fresh fruit, which requires more work at the beginning to press, puree, or steam the juice out of the fruit.

The wine can take anywhere from four weeks to six months or longer to complete. …

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