Academic journal article Military Review

Fragging: Why U.S. Soldiers Assaulted Their Officers in Vietnam

Academic journal article Military Review

Fragging: Why U.S. Soldiers Assaulted Their Officers in Vietnam

Article excerpt

FRAGGING: Why U.S. Soldiers Assaulted Their Officers in Vietnam, George Lepre, Texas Tech University Press, Lubbock, 2011, 318 pages, $27.96.

Military forces have many non-combat casualties. In past wars, forces in camps faced illness and death from exposure, poor food, and improper sanitation. Soldiers can also get sick from the normal health problems that strike civilians. Accidental deaths can happen at any time. Some soldiers, overcome with the cumulative stresses of combat, military life, or personal problems, can turn to suicide. Fratricide, both intentional and unintentional, is a recurring problem.

Recent news articles have discussed the current suicide rates of soldiers and fratricide among U.S. forces and their Afghan allies. Fragging discusses the problem of intentional fratricide during the Vietnam War. "What is the truth about fragging in Vietnam? How often did it really happen? What were the causes?" While there can be attacks on superiors during any war, Vietnam seems to be the war where fratricide became much more frequent and associated with the general history of the war. Fragging reports estimates that there were between 600 to 850 fragging attacks in the Army and between 100 to 150 in the Marine Corps.

George Lepre examines military records with a specific focus on fatal fragging incidents. …

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