Academic journal article College Student Journal

Psychometric Properties of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire for Sultan Qaboos University Students

Academic journal article College Student Journal

Psychometric Properties of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire for Sultan Qaboos University Students

Article excerpt

Research on university student learning has suggested that students' motivational orientations and learning strategies are critical to their academic achievement. In an attempt to assess the levels of motivation and the usage of learning resources and strategies of college students, Pintrich, Smith, Garica and McKeachie (1993) developed an 81-item instrument entitled the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) based on the social cognitive view of motivation and learning. This paper examines the psychomteric properties of the MSLQ for Sultan Qaboos University. A sample of 952 students (506 females and 446 males) who were admitted at Sultan Qaboos University in 2010 completed the MSLQ. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that first-order factor structures of a reduced form (71 items) of the MSLQ provided a good fit to the observed data compared to the second-order factor structures. The scores from the reduced form of the MSLQ exhibited acceptable levels of internal consistency compared to the long form of 81-items. Overall, the results indicate that MSLQ provides reliable and valid interpretations of the motivational orientations and usage of learning strategies and resources of students entering SQU.

Keywords: validity, reliability, confirmatory factor analysis, MSLQ, university students

Introduction

Academic success of university students has been a concern for many educators in Oman. Several examinations of the General Education System in Oman have revealed that students were not academically prepared for the high expectations of university education (Ministry of Education, 1994, 1995, 2007). In addition, many studies have been conducted at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU), which is the only government university in Oman, to identify the factors affecting student success in the university. For example, Al-Shahwarzi, Al-Ghufaili, and Al-Jabri (1991) found no significant correlation between secondary school scores and university grade point averages (GPA). Likewise, Ibrahim, Yahya, and Al-Barwani (1992) found that secondary school scores alone were not a good predictor of university GPA. These results suggest that doing well in secondary school did not mean that students would succeed in university studies. Other personal factors might affect the academic success in the university. In a survey of the university faculty about the basic cognitive skills and attitudes needed for academic success, Al-Barwani, Yahya, and Ibrahim (1997) concluded that first year students tended to have a deficiency in 88% of the skills and attitudes needed for academic success. Along similar lines, Yahya (1997) found that academic motivation might play a role in the academic achievement of the university students. Taken together these SQU studies explained the need for a reliable and valid measure of the motivation- and learning-related factors that might affect the academic success of the university students.

Research on university student learning has suggested that students' motivational orientations and learning strategies are critical to their academic achievement (Artino, 2005; Pintrich & DeGroot, 1990). In an attempt to assess the motivational levels and the usage level of learning resources and strategies of the college students, Pintrich, Smith, Garica and McKeachie (1993) developed an 81-item instrument entitled the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). The design of the MSLQ was based on the social cognitive view of motivation and learning. The motivation section included the components of value, expectations, and affect. The learning section included the components of cognitive-metacognitive strategies and resource management use. Many studies have established relationships between academic achievement and a combination of self-regulated learning skills, motivation, and metacognitive strategies as measured by MSLQ (e.g., Davenport, 1999; Garcia & Pintirch, 1993; Howey, 1999; Pintrich, 2000). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.