Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Glow Fish: A New Biosensor to Detect How Environmental Estrogens Affect Tissues

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Glow Fish: A New Biosensor to Detect How Environmental Estrogens Affect Tissues

Article excerpt

Chemicals that mimic natural estrogens have well-documented effects on the reproductive systems of vertebrates, typically acting as endocrine disruptors, but scientists know much less about how these chemicals affect other tissues and body systems. Investigators have explored zebrafish transgenically modified to glow with green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a way to detect effects of different estrogenic chemicals in real time. A British team now confirms and improves upon previous work by developing an even more sensitive transgenic zebrafish biosensor for assessing potential endocrine disruptors [EHP 120(7):990-996; Lee et al.].

Earlier transgenic models reported exposure only in certain tissues or at very high doses. In the current study, the investigators exposed embryonic transgenic zebrafish at 1 hour postfertilization to environmentally relevant doses of five different estrogenic chemicals: the plasticizer bisphenol A (BPA), the industrial surfactant 4-nonylphenol (NP), the natural steroids estrogen and 17[beta]-estradiol ([E.sub.2]), and 17a-ethinylestradiol ([EE.sub.2]), a synthetic hormone widely used in contraceptive pills and hormone replacement therapy. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.