Academic journal article Journal of Pan African Studies

How African American Teachers' Beliefs about African American Vernacular English Influence Their Teaching

Academic journal article Journal of Pan African Studies

How African American Teachers' Beliefs about African American Vernacular English Influence Their Teaching

Article excerpt

Schools are failing to meet the educational needs of African American Vernacular English (AAVE) speakers. Consequently, the academic achievement of AAVE speakers, and African American students in general, trails that of grade-level peers. Teachers are key components to students' school success. However, many educators lack knowledge of students' cultural and linguistic backgrounds, which can positively or adversely influence student achievement. Nevertheless, some African American teachers working with AAVE speakers find ways to value the rich cultural and linguistic patterns this group brings to school, thus positively impacting student achievement (Foster, 2002).

Using cultural ecological theory and social reproduction as theoretical frameworks, this study examines African American teachers' perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs toward AAVE and AAVE speakers, as well as the classroom practices teachers employ to support the learning of students who come to school with AAVE as their first language. Numerous studies have investigated teacher attitudes toward AAVE, but to date, no research has been conducted to illustrate how, if at all, African American teachers' beliefs/perceptions of AAVE shape their classroom practices. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.