Academic journal article Journal of Pan African Studies

Persisting at Predominantly White Institutions: African Caribbean College Students Narrate Their U.S. Academic Experiences and Administrators' Perspectives

Academic journal article Journal of Pan African Studies

Persisting at Predominantly White Institutions: African Caribbean College Students Narrate Their U.S. Academic Experiences and Administrators' Perspectives

Article excerpt

Retention and graduation rates for minorities, especially African Americans, tend to be lower than for their White peers. Although much research exists on retention and factors that affect retention of African American students, very little seems to address African Caribbean students. The rationale for this qualitative study grew out of the researcher's desire to learn about African Caribbean students and their experiences at predominantly White institutions of higher education in the United States. The researcher hoped that the findings on the persistence of African Caribbean students may lead institutions and administrators to re-examine the current supports they now provide as they attempt to improve student retention for all students.

The data collection methods included interviews, observations, and document analysis. The research sample included 10 African Caribbean students between the ages of 18 and 28 pursuing undergraduate degrees (Bachelors) and 3 administrators at two predominantly White institutions located in the New York area.

Nine findings emerged from the data and provided insight on how African Caribbean students persist at predominantly White institutions of higher education and on administrators' perspectives. …

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