Academic journal article Journal of Pan African Studies

The Price of Adaptation: Hybridization of African Music and Dance from Village to International Stage

Academic journal article Journal of Pan African Studies

The Price of Adaptation: Hybridization of African Music and Dance from Village to International Stage

Article excerpt

Dance companies burgeoned in West Africa following independence from the late 1950s through the 1960s, including the establishment of the Ghana Dance Ensemble (GDE), Le Ballet National du Senegal, and Les Ballets Africains of Guinea. These companies, among others, played major roles in spreading African music and dances across ethnic and international boundaries. These intercultural exchanges and the growth of folklore troupes derived from the policies set forth by newly elected African leaders, such as Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana, Leopold Sedar Senghor of Senegal, and Sekou Toure of Guinea--to mention a few--in response to European colonialism and African independence. With Ghana's independence in 1957, specific indigenous Ghanaian music and dance forms proliferated across ethnic and international boundaries from 1962 onward. In this dissertation, I concentrate on the GDE and the Dagomba ethnic group (they prefer to be called Dagbamba) in the Northern Region of Ghana within the context of African nationalism and globalization. …

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