Academic journal article Journal of Thought

From the Editor

Academic journal article Journal of Thought

From the Editor

Article excerpt

In this issue I begin my role as editor of the Journal of Thought. As the new editor and a novice at editing, I first wish to thank Doug Simpson for both his editorship and stewardship of the journal over the past several years. Under his guidance, Journal of Thought has made the transition from a print journal to a totally on-line one. While managing this transition, he has maintained high editorial standards and presented readers with a variety of perspectives and voices on some of the critical issues of the day.

Similarly, I would like to thank Alan H. Jones for the assistance and guidance he has given me in putting together this, my first issue. As the long-time publisher of Journal of Thought, Alan has been an invaluable guide as I put this first issue together.

I hope you will find reading this issue as interesting as I have found editing it. Wayne Journell leads off with a timely and closely reasoned argument on the need for teachers, and especially social studies teachers, to create diverse public spaces in their classrooms, as opposed to using their discipline to build a "unified narrative," which distorts the real diversity and conflict of the American experience while simultaneously marginalizing American citizens whose stories are excluded or whitewashed in creating a falsified and homogenized narrative.

Tom Culham and Heeson Bai also point to the importance of context and specificity of cultural context by arguing that, while there is substantial evidence that the development of emotional intelligence as conceived by Goleman et al. is both possible and valuable, it is a mistake to conceive of this form of intelligence as a unitary thing, divorced from the practice of virtue within specific normative communities.

Sheron Fraser-Burgess explores yet another aspect of the fact and consequences of diversity by exploring the limitations of Gutmann's conception of deliberative democracy as a way to conduct the work of democracy while being respectful to all individuals in the polity: Some individuals, she points out, are more properly seen as members than as individuals, entering public spaces as bearers of culturally-specific norms and traditions. …

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