Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Brann, Eva, Peter Kalkavage, and Eric Salem. Plato Statesman

Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Brann, Eva, Peter Kalkavage, and Eric Salem. Plato Statesman

Article excerpt

BRANN, Eva, Peter Kalkavage, and Eric Salem. Plato Statesman. Newburyport, Mass.: Focus Publishing, 2012. 166 pp. Paper, $10.95--This new translation is the third by these translators; the two prior being Plato Sophist (1996) and Plato's Phaedo (1998). The renewed interest of the last few decades in Plato's Statesman is added to and expanded on in this very carefully crafted edition. This work provides both the novice and the trained scholar with an excellent source for future reflection on this significant Platonic dialogue and shows why it is as valuable a resource for ascertaining Plato's political philosophy as the Republic and the Laws.

The translation shows even greater precision in detailed rendering of wording than the previous splendid translations above mentioned. Such precision is brought out not only in the translation, when compared to the Greek text, but also in the Glossary, which is arranged in twenty three clusters of Greek words with related meanings.

The Introduction which precedes and the Essay which follows the text of the dialogue provide the reader with significant, provocative, and stimulating insights. The Stranger's use of myth and dialectic leads to comparisons with Socrates' use of both in the Phaedrus. (The Philebus is also a candidate for the use of myth and dialectic by Socrates.) The need to note the backwards and forwards movements of this complex dialogue and to offer commentary on this continual interweaving of the parts that produce the whole is especially noticeable in the Essay.

The Essay divides the dialogue into fourteen parts. It aims at accounting for the many twists and turns of the stranger's speaking to young Socrates as illustrating the practice of dialectic for the young man, who, like Theatetus, has worked exclusively with the mathematical art of measurement but not the art of due measure. …

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