Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Black Macaques Rebounding

Academic journal article The Science Teacher

Black Macaques Rebounding

Article excerpt

Critically endangered Sulawesi black macaques living in an Indonesian nature reserve have been in decline since at least the 1970s. But a new study by researchers at the University of Washington (UW) and in Indonesia shows that their population has stabilized.

The findings, published in the American Journal of Primatology, are from the longest ongoing survey of Macaca nigra.

"Fifteen years ago it looked like this macaque population would eventually disappear," said Randall Kyes, lead author and UW research professor. This study "is good news compared with what we've seen over the past 30-plus years."

Since 1997, Kyes and his Indonesian colleagues have conducted conservation-related studies of the black macaques at the Tangkoko Nature Reserve in North Sulawesi, Indonesia--an area that attracts flocks of tourists each year. He and his team began the population survey in 1999 and collected data through 2011.

Searching a specified section of the forest, the researchers took two daily counts during a two- to three-week survey period each year of the study. The number of groups of macaques per square kilometer increased from 3.6 in 1999 to 3.9 in 2005 and to 4.3 in 2011, the researchers found. …

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