Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

How a District Website Connected a Community during Superstorm Sandy

Academic journal article T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

How a District Website Connected a Community during Superstorm Sandy

Article excerpt

Many people saw the images of the havoc that Superstorm Sandy caused on the East Coast. Not everyone realized, however, that damage from the wind and rain reached far inland, too. At our district in Green Brook Township, NJ, where I serve as superintendent, classes were shut down for nine school days. Yet throughout this extended period, the community at large had access to ongoing communications through our district website. The following are some of the best practices we implemented (and others we learned) for keeping communications In a K-12 community flowing during times of extreme weather and extended closings.

Make Your District Website a Community Hub When you have an incident like a superstorm that impacts many residents, you need to broaden your scope of communications to include information beyond the school schedule. In Green Brook, our government staff could not update the town website once power went out. So the town relied on our (remotely hosted) district website for sharing important news with all residents. We posted the hours and locations of places that were open to people for charging their mobile devices and for warming up, and updates on when utility crews would be in different areas. And of course, we had regular updates on possible reopening dates for our schools.

Make It Mobile

Throughout the disaster period, we sent updated information using our electronic alerts to our subscribers. …

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