Academic journal article D.H. Lawrence Review

Editor's Corner

Academic journal article D.H. Lawrence Review

Editor's Corner

Article excerpt

This issue of the D. H. Lawrence Review features five articles, each examining Lawrence's work from varying perspectives. The first two papers study Lawrence in relation to two very different writers, T. S. Eliot and Emile Zola. Carl Krockel explores Lawrence and Eliot in their relationship to Modernism and their responses to World War I, analyzing reasons for the varying impact each had on contemporary literary criticism--why, for instance, the period is regularly referred to as the "age of Eliot" but never the "age of Lawrence." Zola (1840-1902), a writer of an earlier generation than the Modernists, made a powerful impression on the young Lawrence. Jack Stewart examines the way The Rainbow is linked in particular to Zola's Germinal, a novel set in a coal-mining community and building, like The Rainbow, on "visions of regeneration through motifs of germination."

Earl Ingersoll then takes up the puzzling topic of Lawrence's mixed use of given and family names for various male characters, with pairs of such disparately designated men appearing frequently in his novels--Birkin/Gerald, Lilly/Aaron, Mellors/Clifford, for instance. Lawrence's decision to use a surname rather than a given one is not arbitrary, but rather part of a complex pattern begun in The White Peacock and continued through to Lady Chatterley's Lover. …

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