Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Element of Surprise? Rice as a Source of Arsenic in Children's Diets

Academic journal article Environmental Health Perspectives

Element of Surprise? Rice as a Source of Arsenic in Children's Diets

Article excerpt

Last winter, the discovery of arsenic in foods containing organic brown rice syrup, including toddler formulas, made headlines. Members of the same research team now report higher urinary arsenic concentrations in children who eat any type of rice than in children who don't, suggesting this food may be an important source of arsenic exposure for children in the United States [EHP 120(10):1418-1424; Davis et al.].

Rice is an economic, nutritious staple food consumed around the world, and its popularity is growing in the United States. In addition, rice flours, syrups, and other products are widely used in processed foods. But rice plants are especially well suited to accumulating arsenic from the soil in which they grow. The arsenic content of rice varies widely depending on where it was grown and how it was processed.

In the current study, researchers examined data for 2,323 children who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2003 and 2008. They compared concentrations of arsenic in the urine of children estimated to have eaten at least a quarter cup of cooked rice during the previous 24 hours and the urine of children estimated to have eaten none. These estimates were based on children's consumption of rice itself plus foods that contain rice-based ingredients.

"Rice eaters" had a median urinary arsenic concentration of 8. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.