Academic journal article Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education

Call for a Themed Issue of Australian Journal of Outdoor Education: Theme: Relationships with Others in Outdoor Education

Academic journal article Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education

Call for a Themed Issue of Australian Journal of Outdoor Education: Theme: Relationships with Others in Outdoor Education

Article excerpt

Relationships with others in Outdoor Education

Dewey (1938) argued that learning occurs through interaction. Learning, in this sense, is not something that happens in isolation, it is something that happens in relation to the individual who has the experience, the others involved, and the environment in which it occurs. Priest and Gass (2005) identified four types of relationships that can occur in Outdoor Education. These are intrapersonal, interpersonal, ecosystemic and ekistic relationships.

All of these relationships are present in Outdoor Education, but the focus of this themed issue is relationships with others, or interpersonal relationships. There is an existing body of work examining intrapersonal relationships (e.g. Freeman, 2011), and there is a growing body of work examining ecosystemic and ekistic relationships through, for example, place-based pedagogies (e.g. Wattchow & Brown, 2011) and environmental education (e.g. Sandell & Ohman, 2010), but there has been less of a focus on interpersonal relationships in contemporary Outdoor Education research. Indeed some authors argue that we live in times where learning has become commodified as an individual choice (Roberts, 2012), where the development of relationships with others is devalued (Loynes, 1998), or not recognised as relevant (Hales, 2006).

Contributions are invited that address any aspect of the theme of "Relationships with others in Outdoor Education". Examples of possible topics include:

* Empirical research examining relationships with others;

* Theoretical and philosophical discussions of relationships with others (including why, or why not, relationships with others are important in Outdoor Education, and how relationships with others interact with learning);

* Methodological discussions about how to do research exploring relationships with others;

* Historical analysis of shifts and changes in how relationships with others have been understood and portrayed within Outdoor Education literature. …

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