Academic journal article International Journal of Yoga

Male Reproductive Health and Yoga

Academic journal article International Journal of Yoga

Male Reproductive Health and Yoga

Article excerpt

Byline: Pallav. Sengupta, Prasenjit. Chaudhuri, Koushik. Bhattacharya

Now-a-days reproductive health problems along with infertility in male is very often observed. Various Assisted Reproductive Technologies have been introduced to solve the problem, but common people cannot afford the cost of such procedures. Various ayurvedic and other alternative medicines, along with regular yoga practice are proven to be not only effective to enhance the reproductive health in men to produce a successful pregnancy, but also to regulate sexual desire in men who practice celibacy. Yoga is reported to reduce stress and anxiety, improve autonomic functions by triggering neurohormonal mechanisms by the suppression of sympathetic activity, and even, today, several reports suggested regular yoga practice from childhood is beneficial for reproductive health. In this regard the present review is aimed to provide all the necessary information regarding the effectiveness of yoga practice to have a better reproductive health and to prevent infertility.

Introduction

Infertility and problems in conception have been a concern through the ages. Infertility in men is the inability to fertilize mature ova after mating with female partner, while, in women it is the inability to naturally conceive a child or to carry a pregnancy to full term. There are many reasons why a couple may not be able to conceive, or may not be competent to conceive without medical aid. Infertility has its impact on about 15% of couples of reproductive age, with nearly half of the cases resulting from male factor infertility. [sup][1] The chance of getting pregnant in each menstrual cycle is very high and it has been reported that eight out of every ten women trying for a baby will fall pregnant within the first 6 months. Women who become pregnant without any medical assistance generally do so within 8 months of trying. [sup][2] It is common for couples to seek help or advice if there is difficulty in conceiving. The point at which they may want to seek out help will depend on various aspects, for example, if they are over 35 years of age or if they have any worrying symptoms, the couple should strive for help after about 6 months of trying. [sup][3] In men, various factors may contribute in infertility, like lifestyle, obesity, smoking, or alcohol consumption, including exposure various occupational and environmental metals. These factors result in decreased quality of sperm, by affecting its structure, development, count, and motility. [sup][4]

Since the beginning of time, humans have employed rituals, folk medicines, and various techniques performed by shamans and other healers or revered members of their culture in an effort to potentiate their ability to conceive. Recently, complementary or alternative therapy is often employed for the same perseverance with the intent to enhance the probability of conception and augment a healthy pregnancy with a positive outcome. What may be considered CAM in one culture or country may be part of the traditional health system in another, for example, yoga, which is considered CAM therapy in the United States, has been part of the health system in India for more than 7000 years. [sup][5] CAM therapy is often used to foster wellness, improve the results of traditional therapies, and in the advancement the quality of life. Yoga is being used by a growing number of youth and adults as a means of improving overall health and fitness. There is also a progressive trend toward use of yoga as a mind-body CAM intervention to improve specific physical and mental health conditions. There are some information about the beneficial impact of yoga practice on reproductive health and fertility among common people, but there is no proper evidence-based literature available, which can throw some light on its impact on reproductive health. To provide researchers and clinicians with therapeutically useful information about yoga, the evidence evaluating yoga as an effective intervention for couples suffering with the problems of infertility, is reviewed and summarized. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.