Academic journal article Parergon

Tolmie, Jane and M. J. Toswell, Eds, Laments for the Lost in Medieval Literature

Academic journal article Parergon

Tolmie, Jane and M. J. Toswell, Eds, Laments for the Lost in Medieval Literature

Article excerpt

Tolmie, Jane and M. J. Toswell, eds, Laments Jot the Lost in Medieval Literature (Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 19), Turnhout, Brepols, 2010; hardback; pp. xii, 306; R.R.P. 60.00 [euro]; ISBN 9782503528588.

The essays in Laments Jot the Lost form a broad introduction to lamentation across literatures in Old and Middle English, Latin, Old Norse, Old and Middle French, as well as mystery plays, and even Old Polish drama. Somewhat unusually, the book lacks an introduction from its editors. Instead, Anne L. Klinck calls her essay, the first, a 'contextualizing paper' for what follows (p. 1). She discusses the concept and history of laments and signals the special interest of this volume: mourning for dead children' (p. 17).

That 'special interest' is first explored by Jan M. Ziolkowski in 'Laments for Lost Children: Latin Traditions'. Rebecca Krug's 'Natural Feeling and Unnatural Mothers: Herod the Great, The Life of Saint Bridget, and Chaucer's Clerk's Tale' is an examination of models of medieval parental and family life. Plays about Herod's Massacre of the Innocents are addressed further by Jane Tolmie, who links the theatrical depiction of suffering mothers with ideas of 'God's punishment of Eve for the fall of man' (p. 297).

M. J. Toswell investigates the use of lament psalms in medieval England and their relationship with Old English poetry in the context of 'grief work' because laments 'provide a way to perform that grief, to provide words for the work of mourning' (p. …

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