Academic journal article Cervantes: Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of America

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Cervantes: Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of America

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

WE HAVE NOW FULLY entered the season of Cervantine commemorations, a season that initially began in 2005 with the 400th anniversary of the publication of part one of Don Quixote. Now, well into 2013, we take note of the fourth centennial of the publication of the Novelas ejemplares. Two years from now, in 2015, we will commemorate the 400th anniversary of the publication of the second part of Don Quixote. (Which is not to mention--at least not outside this particular set of parentheses--next year's recognition of Alonso Fernandez de Avellaneda's 1614 publication of his own preemptive and unauthorized "second part.") Soon it will be 2016, the year we mark the fourth centennial of Cervantes's passing, which will be followed in 2017 by the 400th anniversary of the posthumous appearance of Los trabajos de Persiles y Sigismunda.

In celebration of the 400th anniversary of the Novelas ejemplares, we begin this Spring 2013 issue with two articles on the topic. Brian Brewer examines "El celoso extremeno" and argues that Cervantes's representation of Carrizales, whose jealousy, he says, corresponds to early modern notions of commercial ethics, transcends that of the traditional "jealous husband" in order to create a more nuanced character study involving an economic discourse that links jealousy and avarice. Eduardo Olid Guerrero, for his part, examines "La espanola inglesa" and upacks the various ways in which Cervantes's representation of Queen Elizabeth I reflects ongoing early modern social and political debates about Machiavelli's Prince.

Following these two articles on the Novelas ejemplares, we offer two essays involving the representation of Islam--and, in particular, the concept of taqiyya (the permissible dissimulation of Christianity by a devout Muslim)--in Cervantes's work. Robert Stone focuses his attention on Don Quixote itself and argues that the novel's Morisco episodes should be read as a subtle form of literary taqiyya. …

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