Academic journal article Education & Treatment of Children

An Exploratory Survey of the Perceived Value of Coaching Activities to Support PBIS Implementation in Secure Juvenile Education Settings

Academic journal article Education & Treatment of Children

An Exploratory Survey of the Perceived Value of Coaching Activities to Support PBIS Implementation in Secure Juvenile Education Settings

Article excerpt

Positive behavior interventions and supports (PBIS) is a framework for applying a continuum of evidence-based practices to improve academic and social outcomes for all students (Sugai et al., 2010). As a systems-change model, PBIS is being implemented in over 18,000 schools across the nation in public schools at all grade levels, as well as in alternative schools, and other types of educational and residential programs for children and youth (R. Horner, personal communication, 2012). School-wide PBIS is typically organized as a multitiered model focusing on three overarching goals: (1) prevention of new cases of challenging behaviors by creating clear and predictable environments throughout a school (or facility), (2) early intervention for emerging behavior problems, and (3) intensive intervention for youth who exhibit chronic or severe behavioral difficulties (Sugai et al., 2010). Design and implementation of a tiered system of interventions typically follows the PBIS logic model developed and promoted by the Office of Special Education Programs Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (www.pbis.org). A rapidly expanding body of evidence supports the efficacy of this model for producing desirable academic and social outcomes (Bradshaw, Mitchell, & Leaf, 2010; Horner et al., 2009; Office of Special Education Programs, 2009).

As evidence documenting the success of PBIS for improving student discipline in public schools accumulates, this model is being extended into non-traditional settings, including secure juvenile correctional settings (Jolivette & Nelson, 2010). There are several reasons for this movement, including calls from advocates for more responsive programming to better meet the mental health needs of adjudicated youth (Gagnon & Barber, 2010), the special education needs of adjudicated youth (Quinn, Rutherford, Leone, Osher, & Poirier, 2005), and the failure of juvenile correctional programs to effectively rehabilitate over half of the population of incarcerated juveniles (Snyder & Sickmund, 2006). Each of these populations responds more favorably to the type of positive, instructional programing reflected in PBIS than to punishment-oriented approaches (Lipsey, 2009). Another reason for this movement toward a positive behavioral approach is in response to legal actions over abusive treatment in secure facilities (Grisso, 2007). Legislative action in Texas directed the state juvenile correctional agency to implement PBIS in the education programs of all state secure juvenile facilities, with the goal of reducing the amount of time youth were removed from classes due to disciplinary reasons.

In addition to examinations of the overall effectiveness of PBIS and calls for implementing it in non-traditional settings, researchers have begun investigating factors that contribute to fidelity, sustainability, and scalability of PBIS practices (Sugai et al., 2010). That is, focus has shifted from the question of "Does PBIS work?" to "What are the specific practices that will increase the likelihood of success, fidelity, and sustained implementation?" Fixsen, Naoom, Blase, Friedman, and Wallace (2005) conducted a substantive review of implementation research across multiple domains (i.e., mental health, medicine, juvenile justice, manufacturing, social services, child welfare) and found that specific intervention practices and processes appear to be essential facilitators of implementation success, and are applicable across domains and types of interventions. One facilitator they identified is coaching. PBIS coaching has been described as an essential element of building and sustaining implementation with fidelity (Horner, 2009; Kincaid & March, 2011; Scott & Martinek, 2006). With any educational initiative, coaching appears to be a critical component in acquiring new skills and producing generalized behavior change (Joyce & Showers, 1982). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.