Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

Board Limits Bargaining Units in Health Facilities

Academic journal article Monthly Labor Review

Board Limits Bargaining Units in Health Facilities

Article excerpt

Union efforts to organize hospital and nursing home employees were adversely affected by a National Labor Relations Board ruling that the number of bargaining units in such institutions must be held to a minimum. The Board contended that the ruling conformed with a requirement imposed by the Congress in 1974 when it extended to employees of nonprofit health care facilities the right to bargain on wages and benefits. In granting this right, the Congress specified that bargaining units in such institutions should be as broad as possible to reduce the possibility that a small number of workers could paralyze a hospital. The Board did not specify the precise number of bargaining units that would be appropriate in a hospital, but one Board member said that four units might be appropriate in a large institution and two in a small one.

The case arose when the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers organized a small number of trades workers at St. Francis Hospital in Memphis, TN. In 1982, the Board ruled that the hospital must bargain with the union. At that time, the Board maintained that the basic test for a bargaining unit was whether the workers shared "a community of interests" in their wages, hours, training, and working conditions, the same requirement that applies in other industries. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.