Academic journal article British Journal of Community Justice

Response to Thought Piece: The Use of Avatar Based Learning as a Medium for Criminal Justice Education: Vol. 10, No. 1, Spring/summer 2012

Academic journal article British Journal of Community Justice

Response to Thought Piece: The Use of Avatar Based Learning as a Medium for Criminal Justice Education: Vol. 10, No. 1, Spring/summer 2012

Article excerpt

I was interested to read the Thought Piece by Annette Crisp on the use of Avatar based learning in the spring/summer 2012 edition of the journal. I think Crisp provides an example of some very innovative and creative pedagogical methods in criminal justice education that could be applied to a wide range of teaching and learning within universities. I am aware of the increasing use of a range of social media by young people in particular. Crisp challenges all of us involved in teaching and learning to embrace and harness these new forms of communication and interaction rather than simply ban them from the classroom. She gives examples of how the students in her teaching sessions have been engaged and enthralled by some of her use of avatars to explain theoretical perspectives and depict situations in which offending occurs, and how this has encouraged debate in the student group.

In wanting to support these developments and encourage this harnessing of new and creative forms of technology for teaching purposes I also wish to raise a few issues of concern that I hope will inform the debate that Crisp is stimulating through her work and her writing.

One question relates to the students themselves. Whilst it might be tempting to make assumptions that young students will find this form of learning more attractive than mature students I acknowledge this may not be the case. However, I can envisage some mature students being deterred by the use of 'virtual' characters as opposed to 'real' people, with the risk that images may appear to be cartoonish and provoke some resistance to learning. I would be interested to know more about how different groups of students respond to these methods and how some potential resistance may be overcome.

My main concern relates to the issue of reductionism. The use of avatars may offer an opportunity to consider the visual 'drama' of an event or a set of circumstances, such as a domestic violence incident, as it unfolds and this may make a strong impact on students. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.