Academic journal article The International Sports Law Journal

The Contador Doping Saga Continues: CAS Is Now Involved!

Academic journal article The International Sports Law Journal

The Contador Doping Saga Continues: CAS Is Now Involved!

Article excerpt

Alberto Contador, one of only five cyclists so far to win the three Grand Tours - the Tour de France (three times), Giro d'Italia and Spanish Vuelta - has not yet crossed the finishing line as far as his alleged doping offence is concerned.

The 28-year old Spaniard tested positive for the banned substance clenbuterol (a fat-burning and muscle-building drug) just days before his 2010 Tour de France win in July of last year. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) regards clenbuterol as a zero-tolerance drug, although under the WADA Anti Doping Code, athletes are able to escape a sanction if they prove "no fault or negligence" on their part (see Article 10.5.1 of the WADA Anti Doping Code 2009). It should be noted, however, that this Article only eliminates a sanction, but does not expunge the doping offence itself, which still stands.

But the Spanish Cycling Federation (RFEC) cleared Contador in February of this year accepting his claim that the minute traces of this banned substance found in his urine got into his system through his inadvertently eating contaminated beef. Originally, the RFEC imposed a one-year ban and then changed this to a no ban at all.

For further details and comment on the background to this affair by Professor Blackshaw, the author of this present News Item, see 'Tour de France: latest doping investigations' posted on the Asser International Sports Law Centre website on 2010-11-22.

However, the International Cycling Union (UCI), Cycling's World Governing Body, announced on 24 March, 2011 that it will ask sport's highest court, the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), based in Lausanne, Switzerland, to ban Contador for doping.

According to the UCI President, Pat McQuaid:

  "We've studied the case and we feel there's strict liability
  whereby the athlete has to prove how the product got into his
  system. … 
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.