Academic journal article Voices: The Journal of New York Folklore

From the Director

Academic journal article Voices: The Journal of New York Folklore

From the Director

Article excerpt

The Schoharie Creek, which has its origins near Windham, NY, feeds the Gilboa Reservoir in Southern Schoharie County. Its waters provide drinking water for New York City, turn the electricity-generating turbines at the New York Power Authority, and are then loosed again to meander up the Schoharie Valley to Schoharie Crossing, the site of an Erie Canal Aqueduct, where the waters of the Schoharie Creek enter the Mohawk River. Because it is a "captive river" (in that its waters do not flow unheeded and are interrupted by the dam at Gilboa), the Schoharie Creek in summertime is sleepy and unhurried. In my little hamlet along the Schoharie, summertime visitors clamber over rocks to float in the dwindling swimming holes, which shrink as the summer heat intensifies.

In August 2011, the Schoharie Valley experienced mass destruction and loss of property as Hurricane Irene barreled through the northern Catskills region and down the Valley. Originally forecast as headed for New York City and Long Island, Hurricane Irene caught residents unaware, as torrential rains engorged creek beds and toppled trees, and strong winds tore roofs from buildings. The Schoharie Creek swelled to over a mile wide through the Schoharie Valley, flooding homes and businesses in numerous Catskills communities and destroying historic landmarks such as Blenheim's historic Covered Bridge that had stood since 1855 as the longest single-span covered wooden bridge in the world. …

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