Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Phronesis Vol. 58, No. 4, 2013

Academic journal article The Review of Metaphysics

Phronesis Vol. 58, No. 4, 2013

Article excerpt

Comparing Lives in Plato, Laws 5, JAMES WARREN

In Laws 5 (732d-34e), the Athenian argues in favor of virtuous over vicious lives on the basis that the former are preferable to the latter when we consider the pleasures and pains in each. This essay offers an interpretation of the argument which does not attribute to the Athenian an exclusively hedonist axiology. It argues for a new reading of the division of "types of life" at 733c-d and suggests that the Athenian relies on the conclusion established earlier in the Laws that we humans take pleasure in harmony and order. Virtuous lives exhibit just such harmony and order and are therefore always more pleasant than and preferable to vicious lives.

Why the Intellect Cannot Have a Bodily Organ: De Anima 3.4, CALEB COHOE

The author reconstructs Aristotle's reasons for thinking that the intellect cannot have a bodily organ. He presents Aristotle's account of the "aboutness" or intentionality of cognitive states, both perceptual and intellectual. On his interpretation, Aristotle's account is based around the notion of cognitive powers taking on forms in a special preservative way. Based on this account, Aristotle argues that no physical structure could enable a bodily part or combination of bodily parts to produce or determine the full range of forms that the human intellect can understand. For Aristotle, cognitive powers with bodily organs are always spatio-temporally limited, but the understanding is not. …

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