Academic journal article American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

The Role of Academic Pharmacy to Influence Safety through Science and Education

Academic journal article American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

The Role of Academic Pharmacy to Influence Safety through Science and Education

Article excerpt

The importance of ensuring medication safety, in all its contexts, is a primary reason why pharmacists are licensed healthcare professionals. In turn, the assurance that pharmacists are competent falls at the feet of educators and the public's health is better for it. AACP members take this responsibility to ensure the competence of pharmacists very seriously. Our standing committees and their associated annual reports reflect their commitment to this responsibility.

In this issue of the Journal, David Holdford and colleagues, in partnership with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), build upon the recommendations of the annual report from the 2006-2007 Argus Commission: "The Academy's Agenda for Improving the Safety of Medication Use: Report of the 2006-2007 Argus Commission." The Commission, comprised of the 5 immediate past presidents of AACP, was charged by then-AACP President Marilyn Speedie to review the 2006 release of the Institute of Medicine's Quality Chasm Series: Preventing Medication Errors, and "analyze the report and discern the implications of the report's recommendations on the Association and its member institutions."

The Commission report states that a culture of safety should permeate the practice of pharmacy in all settings. The fulfillment of this goal of public protection requires acceptance by the Academy for "engaging partners ... and assuming leadership in education ...; research ...; and practice ..." The multiple recommendations and suggestions emanating from the report focus on all 3 elements of the mission of higher education. The Commission clearly articulated an interprofessional vision for meeting the public need for improving medication safety. Like the multi-eyed giant of myth, members of the Commission may have recognized that the FDA was about to undergo one of its most extensive transformations through passage of Public Law 110-85, the "Food and Drug Administration Amendment Act of 2007." The development of legislative provisions concerned with improving the science-base of the FDA were strengthened by the input from academic pharmacy. The public's health could be better ensured by expecting a closer working relationship between the agency and academic institutions through improvements to advisory committee recruitment, restrictive drug decisions, clinical trial registry databases, and other provisions. …

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