Academic journal article American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

Brent I. Fox, Margaret R. Thrower, and Bill G. Felkey. Building Core Competencies in Pharmacy Informatics

Academic journal article American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

Brent I. Fox, Margaret R. Thrower, and Bill G. Felkey. Building Core Competencies in Pharmacy Informatics

Article excerpt

Brent I. Fox, Margaret R. Thrower, and Bill G. Felkey. Building Core Competencies in Pharmacy Informatics. Washington, D.C.: American Pharmacists Association; 2010. 507 pp, $44.95 (hardcover), ISBN 989-1-58212-144-4.

In 2007, the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) mandated pharmacy programs to incorporate informatics competencies in their curricula. Since then, both new and existing pharmacy programs have taken the initiative to address informatics in their programs. Some programs have created standalone courses; while others may have spread the competencies throughout the curriculum in courses such as drug information, communication, public health, and many others. Informatics is fairly new to pharmacy, which is coupled with the challenge of providing didactic instructions in this area to pharmacy students. The need for a comprehensive reference guide is therefore warranted. Few published books have addressed informatics; however, this book is comprehensive and addresses practitioners and educators as well as students.

This book is divided into 9 units and 28 chapters. Unit 1: Foundations of Pharmacy Informatics, Unit II: Computing and Telecommunication Fundamentals, Unit III: Health Care Data Management and Exchange, Unit IV: Medication Use Process I, Unit V: Medication Use Process II, Unit VI: Medication Use Process III, Unit VII: Medication Use Process IV, Unit VIII: Medication Use Process V, Unit IX: Pharmacy Informatics Ecosystem.

Each unit begins with clearly defined competencies and a brief description. This is followed by specific chapter objectives. This approach directs the reader to the content in a way that enhances learning. Unit 1 describes the 5 core competencies linking them to pharmacy practice, education, medication use processes, and technology. It also highlights the driving forces, enablers, and barriers of health information technology (HIT) adoption. The support and contributions from various associations and organizations are emphasized. Unit II and III address the computer systems and telecommunications. These units detail basic technology as the foundation for health information exchange. The basics target the different generations in pharmacy workforce and help with the understanding of the concepts and foundation of informatics. …

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