Academic journal article Education

The Effects Behavior Problems in Preschool Children Have on Their School Adjustment

Academic journal article Education

The Effects Behavior Problems in Preschool Children Have on Their School Adjustment

Article excerpt

The transition from home to school is one of the most significant changes in a child's life (Bart et al., 2007; Belsky & MacKinnon, 1994; Fabian, 2002; Pianta, Cox, Taylor, & Early, 1999). It is one of the most life-changing experiences children experience, with significant implications for their identity development (Ecclestone, Biesta & Hughes, 2010; Woods, Boyle & Hubbard, 1999, as cited in Brooker, 2002). At school, children learn how to relate to non-parental authority figures, and how to join and take part in a new peer group (Ladd et al., 1999; Ladd, 2003; Pianta, Steinberg & Rollins, 1995; Silver, Measelle, Armstrong & Essex, 2005). Adjustment to school involves all the behaviors that children use to adjust to their school environment (Gulay, 2011). The first environment they encounter in the process of adaptation to school is preschool education institutions. Research has revealed that the learning experiences acquired in the preschool period have positive impact on children's school adjustment. Children who are adapting well to school are careful and active. These children can work independently and tend to have a high academic achievement (Ban, Hajami & BarHaim, 2007; Buhs & Ladd, 2001). It has been noted that children who are unable to adjust in the preschool periodusually display difficulties in both their social relationships and academic success (Ladd, 1990; Ladd, Birch & Buhs, 1999; Parker & Asher, 1987).

Children can demonstrate either adjustment or, occasionally, behavior problems when confronted with new rules and limitations in the preschool period. According to the results of the research, approximately 48% of children, are not successful in the transition process from home to preschool (Hausken & Rathbunm, 2002; Rimm-Kaufman et al., 2000). The results of recent research studies show that in the preschool period children in certain risk groups portray problem behaviors (Harden et al., 2000; Herrera & Little, 2005). Behavior problems include externalising behaviors such as impulsivity, anger outbursts, hitting, stealing, threatening and disturbing others due to the weakness of their emotions and behaviors; and internalising behaviors include such things as shyness, physical complaints and anxiety problems related to fear and distractibility (Keenan & Wakschlag, 2000;Merrill,2001; Merrel, 1995; Pike et al., 2006; Spence et al., 2001).

In the research by Tulley and Chiu (1995), 58 teacher trainees undergoing training in preschool classes listed the problematic behaviors they encountered as talking, carelessness, indifference, aggression, or rough and scurrilous talking. Excessive activity refers to oppressive, careless and non-ceasing behaviors. Excessively active/hyperactive children have shown behavioral problems, such as communication problems, academic failure and aggression (Keown, 2000). The frequency of hyperactivity and inattention behaviors in the preschool period is 3-4% (Goldman et al., 1998). In the study performed by Gomes and Livesey (2008) it was determined that excessively active children fail to be attuned to their class. One of the behavior problems we see in preschool children is their being full of anxiety and fear (Kirkincioglu, 2003). According to Miller (2004), anxieties are widespread among preschool children. The rates of attendance and adjustment of anxious/shy children to class can be low. This situation has been further associated with adjustment to school and loneliness levels later in life (Ladd & Burgess, 2001; Rubin & Burgess, 2001; Stoeckli, 2010). Aggressive behavior is a special form of non-social behavior (Kempes et al., 2005). The research suggests that children who exhibit aggressive behaviors including such non-social behaviors as insult, teasing, threatening may frequently be exposed to refusal, exclusion by his/her peers (Bonica et al., 2003;Bloomquist & Schell, 2002; Harwood, 2010; Hay et al. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.