Academic journal article NBER Reporter

Well Worth Saving: How the New Deal Safeguarded Home Ownership

Academic journal article NBER Reporter

Well Worth Saving: How the New Deal Safeguarded Home Ownership

Article excerpt

Well Worth Saving: How the New Deal Safeguarded Home Ownership, by Price Fishback, Jonathan Rose, and Kenneth Snowden, is the latest monograph in the NBER's series on Long-Term Factors in Economic Development.

The urgent demand for housing after World War I fueled a boom in residential construction that led to historic peaks in home ownership. Foreclosures at the time were rare, and when they did happen, lenders could quickly recoup their losses by selling into a strong market. But no mortgage system is equipped to deal with credit problems on the scale of the Great Depression. As foreclosures quintupled, it became clear that the mortgage system of the 1920s was not up to the task, and borrowers, lenders, and real estate professionals sought action at the federal level.

Well Worth Saving tells the story of the disastrous housing market during the Great Depression and the extent to which an immensely popular New Deal relief program, the Home Owners' Loan Corporation (HOLC), was able to stem foreclosures by buying distressed mortgages from lenders and refinancing them. Drawing on historical records and modern statistical tools, Price Fishback, Jonathan Rose, and Kenneth Snowden investigate important unanswered questions to provide an unparalleled view of the mortgage loan industry throughout the 1920s and early 1930s. …

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