Academic journal article Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

Editor's Page

Academic journal article Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness

Editor's Page

Article excerpt

Happy New Year! Last year, when I wrote the editorial for the first issue of the Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness (JVIB) for 2013, it was to announce the first of six double issues per year to be published annually in our new, solely digital format. Because many libraries missed the print version, I am pleased to announce that JVIB will be offering a print edition for Institutional Premium Print subscribers in 2014. Please contact JVIB's customer service department for more information on how your workplace can receive JVIB in print: Customer Service, 1000 Fifth Avenue, Suite 350, Huntington, WV 25701; phone: 304-710-3027; e-mail: .

One of the things I enjoy most about the job of being the journal's editor in chief is reading all the submissions that are sent to JVIB. The articles and reports, letters and book reviews that are submitted by professionals from countries around the world contain information about research and practice that is being conducted on every topic imaginable related to visual impairment and blindness. With authors representing seven different countries, this January-February 2014 issue truly demonstrates the international flavor of JVIB.

Four of the contributions in this issue touch on (no pun intended) haptics from four different perspectives. Zebehazy and Wilton report results from a survey of teachers of students with visual impairments that asked about their perceptions of the quality and importance of graphics (tactile and print) used by children who are visually impaired, and their instruction in the use of such graphics. Jones and colleagues explore the efficacy of a haptic device and a computer simulation in which haptic feedback is provided to students with visual impairments in science classrooms to teach the concepts of heat and pressure that are associated with particle movement. Koutsoklenis and Papadopoulos re port on their examination of haptic cues and their determination regarding which were used more frequently and which were most important for wayfinding in urban environments. …

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