Academic journal article American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

Student Pharmacists' Clinical Interventions in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences at a Community Nonteaching Hospital

Academic journal article American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

Student Pharmacists' Clinical Interventions in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences at a Community Nonteaching Hospital

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION

The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) requires that the curricula of colleges and schools of pharmacy lead to the development of graduates who contribute to patient care in collaboration with patients, prescribers, and other members of the healthcare team. (1) The ACPE highlights several aspects of students' contributions to patient care in preparation for their role as future pharmacists, including providing patient education, optimizing the pharmaceutical care of patients, and communicating with other healthcare providers. The ACPE also recommends the documentation and assessment of the nature and extent of students' interactions with patients and healthcare professionals.

Several studies have evaluated the impact of student pharmacists at experiential practice sites in different healthcare settings in relation to the types and significance of clinical interventions, as well as on cost savings to the institution. (2-11) Student pharmacists have had a significant impact in improving patient care and in providing cost savings to the institution. While at the experiential practice sites, each student pharmacist made an average of 1.2 to 16 recommendations per week to prescribers, with an acceptance rate of 32% to 98%.11 Cost savings or cost avoidance was also associated with having student pharmacists at experiential sites.

Most published studies report the impact of student pharmacists in teaching institutions, (3-4,7-10) although some do not specify the teaching status of the site. (2,6) These studies have evaluated students in a variety of APPEs, including ambulatory care, internal medicine, pediatrics, and psychiatry. Although academic medical centers are ideal sites for training student pharmacists, community non-teaching hospitals are viable training sites for student pharmacists given the growing need for experiential education sites and the limited availability of teaching hospitals in certain geographic locations.

There are several major differences between teaching hospitals and community nonteaching hospitals. Medical personnel at community nonteaching hospitals are primarily independent practitioners who may be hospitalists with full-time hospital-based practices or consultant physicians with outpatient clinic-based practices, while medical personnel at teaching hospitals usually include medical students, interns, residents, and attending physicians. Thus, each setting affords a different level of interaction and communication in terms of clinical recommendations between student pharmacists and the medical team, ie, student pharmacists mostly interact with medical students and residents in a teaching hospital, compared with attending physicians in community nonteaching hospitals. In academic medical centers, pharmacists and student pharmacists attend multidisciplinary rounds as part of a service, while pharmacy practitioners in community nonteaching hospitals practice with more independence. (12) In this setting, pharmacy practitioners typically monitor patients in specific regions of the hospital, and independently collect and analyze patient information as they perform medication therapy management services. Community nonteaching hospitals provide student pharmacists with a great opportunity for one-on-one interactions with physicians and other healthcare providers, and give students the opportunity to develop interpersonal skills and to work as part of an interdisciplinary team. (12) This setting also provides students with a greater one-on-one consultation time with their patients compared to medical team rounds, whereby attending physicians or medical residents take the lead roles in patient interactions, allowing student pharmacists minimal patient interaction during rounds. While student pharmacists can proactively make recommendations to the medical team on rounds at teaching hospitals, the nature of the clinical recommendations in nonteaching hospitals may be reactive to orders a physician has already placed. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.