Academic journal article Air Power History

From the Editor

Academic journal article Air Power History

From the Editor

Article excerpt

In this issue of Air Power History, A.D. Harvey examines "Air Power in Perspective." He concludes that strategic bombing during World War II is debated today primarily in terms of its ethical aspects. He also advances some fresh ideas concerning air warfare, including the assertion that the Luftwaffe wore out its fighters escorting bombers across the English Channel. Moreover, he asserts that the Axis did not run out of machines, but rather of men trained to operate them.

J. Norman Grim presents a biography of "Lt. Col. Clifford Werly: Barnstormer, Combat B-29 Pilot, and Pilot Extraordinaire." Werly loved flying so much that he spent his hard-earned money to pay for flying lessons and planes. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force to fight against the Axis, then transferred to the U.S. Army Air Corps after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The third article, by Daniel Haulman, details the activities of the United States Air Force in Bosnia from 1992 to 1995. After the end of the Cold War, in the late 1980s, Yugoslavia became embroiled in civil wars to establish the independence of its various nationalities. The U.S. Air Force was obliged to operate under United Nations and NATO rules--not a simple task.

Forrest Marion concludes the featured articles with his account of Air Force Special Tactics Personnel. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.