Academic journal article The Journal of Rehabilitation

Sincerity of Effort Differences in Functional Capacity Evaluations

Academic journal article The Journal of Rehabilitation

Sincerity of Effort Differences in Functional Capacity Evaluations

Article excerpt

A functional capacity evaluation (FCE) is a multi-hour or occasionally multi-day assessment of an individual's X. Jkphysical capabilities, most often performed by a physical or occupational therapist (Genovese & Galper, 2009; Gouttebarge, Wind, Kuijer, Sluiter, & Frings-Dresen, 2010; James & MacKenzie, 2009; L. Matheson, 2003). Functional capacity evaluations are also referred to as functional capacity assessments (FCA), physical capacity evaluations (PCE), work capacity evaluations (WCE) or functional abilities evaluations (FAE; Genovese & Galper, 2009). The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) defines a functional capacity evaluation as a measure of "the ability of an individual to perform functional or work-related tasks and predicts the potential to sustain these tasks over a defined time frame" (APTA, 2011, p.2).

The FCE's purpose is to objectively determine the individual's functional limitations and physical capacities to work (Dresen, 2004; Gouttebarge, Wind, Paul, Kujer, & Frings, 2004; Gross, Battie, & Cassidy, 2004; R. Matheson, 2003; Reneman, Fokkens, Diijkstra, Geertzen & Froothoff, 2005). The FCE report is utilized to compare one's demonstrated capacities following injury to the demands of one's job to determine the ability of the worker to safely return to work (Kaplan, Wurtele, & Gillis, 1996; R. Matheson, Iserhagen, & Hart, 2002). Other uses of the FCE include identifying on the job accommodations, developing work conditioning programs, determining entitlement to disability- related benefits, and providing a framework for vocational rehabilitation services (Gouttebarge et al., 2004; Gross et al., 2004; Reneman et al., 2005).

After a worker has been diagnosed with a medical condition, the question of whether or not the worker can return to work must be answered. Historically, determining a worker's physical capacities was the task of the individual's physician (Genovese & Galper, 2009). However, as the requirement for detailed functional capacity information increased, the functional capacity evaluation process emerged (Genovese & Galper, 2009; Warren, Cupon, & Steinbaugh, 2004).

According to Genovese and Galper (2009), the first work capacity evaluation was developed in 1975 by Leonard Matheson at the Work Preparation Center at Ranchos Los Amigos Hospital in California. It was developed in response to a change in the California Workers' Compensation Law which required physicians to complete a form addressing the work capacities for patients involved in workers' compensation. In response to these requests both in California and throughout the United States, physicians began to rely upon physical and occupational therapists to provide the requested information regarding work function capabilities. In 1983, the Polinsky Functional Capacity Assessment was the first widely available commercial FCE and, in the late 1980s, Blankenship FCEs became available. After 1990, many other commercial FCEs were in use. These functional capacity evaluations integrated the medical diagnosis provided by a physician with the measured functional abilities of the worker to perform the demands of work as outlined in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles, the Selected Characteristics of Occupations as Defined in the Revised Dictionary of Occupational Titles and The Revised Handbook for Analyzing Jobs (APTA, 2011).

The FCE process typically begins with the therapist obtaining the worker's informed consent, as recommended by the APTA and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). Informed consent includes discussion of what the FCE involves, risks associated with the test, and what is expected of the worker being evaluated (Genovese & Galper, 2009). Although consent can be obtained verbally, it is recommended that consent is obtained in writing and that there are procedures in place to communicate this information to illiterate and non-English speaking workers (Genovese & Galper, 2009). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.