Academic journal article Library Philosophy and Practice

Managing Access to E-Journals: A Study of Technical University Libraries of North India

Academic journal article Library Philosophy and Practice

Managing Access to E-Journals: A Study of Technical University Libraries of North India

Article excerpt

Introduction: Recently, digital environment has made accessible so many exciting opportunities for academic and research libraries in the form of e-journals, that these have become the most popular form of e-resources which are gaining ground with the growth and expansion of the Internet. Tech-savvy users, being aware of many value-added features of e-journals, demand easy and seamless access to current information in the form of e-journals on their desktops. Providing seamless access to e-journals has always been the utopia of library and information professionals. The main concern of libraries is to provide anywhere anytime access to the users for e-journals. Johnston (1998) raised an important concern by arguing, "With the introduction of e-journals comes the question of accessibility, for the quality of the text and its academic standing is of little importance, if the access is difficult or impossible." Therefore, furnishing consistent and persistent access to e-journals has emerged as a significant challenge due to the involvement of many modalities. Various protocols necessary for providing consistent access are to choose an appropriate acquisition approach; negotiating for site license agreements; selecting unconventional means of dissemination of e-journals; making the users cognizant about e-journals, and above all, building a compatible infrastructure for prompt access of information from e-journals.

This paper presents results of a research work undertaken to review present facilities for providing seamless access to e-journals in technical university libraries of North India.

Review of literature: Quite a significant proportion of the recent literature about e-journals has concentrated on the various aspects of managing access to e-journals. Lo (2001) discussed the results of a continuous study of issues pertaining to access of e-journals which were distributed via the Taiwan Academic Network (TANet). She reported that if e-journals are to succeed as a new channel of scholarly communication, the issue related to access needs to be given due consideration. Felts (2002) highlighted that too many places to locate e-journals has emerged as one of the persistent problems in finding journal literature. Jackson Library at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), has simplified the process with Journal Finder, a locally developed software solution that seamlessly integrates e-journal content, pay-per-view content, local print holdings, unmediated document delivery (fully funded by the Library), and interlibrary loan, for comprehensive, unmediated, 'one stop shop' access to journal articles. White and Davies (2005) described work by the Library and Information Statistics Unit (LISU) based at Loughborough University to support decision making by managers in academic information and library services in the UK in the realm of providing access to scholarly information through serials. A model was built against which to assess a series of propositions, or 'deals', from different publishers for e-journals collections through the National Electronic Site License Initiative (NESLI). Anderson (2005) revealed the issues related to implementing access to e-journals for the users of the Eastern Washington University Libraries (EWUL). The demand of the users is for convenient 24hour access to full-text journals in a rapid, convenient manner. They want 'anytime, anywhere' access to information and they do not want to enter a library to obtain it. EWUL chose to provide access to full-text journals in two ways i.e. through the OPAC and through Cold Fusion Database. Patra (2006) shared the experience of introducing e-journal services in Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute. She described in detail the activities related to provided e-journal services to the users and its impact on library operations. The author felt that e-journals have added a lot of weightage to library collections and improved the services being provided by the library. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.