Academic journal article Military Review

Fighting Fox Company: The Battling Flank of the Band of Brothers

Academic journal article Military Review

Fighting Fox Company: The Battling Flank of the Band of Brothers

Article excerpt

FIGHTING FOX COMPANY: The Battling Flank of the Band of Brothers

Terry Poyser and Bill Brown, Casemate, Havertown, PA, 2013, 344 pages, $32.95

The book and miniseries Band of Brothers practically made Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, a household term. But while Easy Company fought its way through the Normandy countryside, the dikes of Holland, the forests of Bastogne, and into the heart of Germany during World War II, Fox Company fought equally hard on Easy's flank.

Through careful research and interviews with veterans, Terry Poyser and Bill Brown have created a unit history for Fox Company, with all its training, fighting, and comradeship. While Fighting Fox Company parallels the experience of Band of Brothers, it follows a different narrative. Historian Stephen Ambrose created leaders, heroes, and villains in Band of Brothers, particularly in the officer corps. Fighting Fox Company is mostly the story of the enlisted men, often using entire letters written to loved ones or whole pages of first-person accounts to tell its story. The only officer truly fleshed out is Lt. Andrew Tuck, who commanded a platoon, then the company at the end of the war.

Fox Company trained at Toccoa and Fort Benning, Ga., before shipping off to England to prepare for the invasion of Normandy. Parachuting behind Utah Beach on June 6, the men were scattered and fought separate battles until they were able to find their units. Two members of Fox Company helped capture a German battery and Brecourt Manor, and one was the last Americans to leave the battlefield. In the battle for Carantan, which united the Utah and Omaha beachheads, a German armor unit struck Fox Company. …

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