Academic journal article Literacy Learning: The Middle Years

Vale NEA Stewart-Dore: 'Bitter News to Hear and Bitter Tears to Shed ...'

Academic journal article Literacy Learning: The Middle Years

Vale NEA Stewart-Dore: 'Bitter News to Hear and Bitter Tears to Shed ...'

Article excerpt

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The ALEA family is mourning the passing our dear friend and professional colleague, Nea Stewart Dore. Dr Margaret (Nea) Stewart-Dore of Emu Park, Queensland, Australia died on Saturday 28 June 2014, beloved wife of Colin and sister of John, sister-in-law of Rosalie, Aunty to Craig, Ross, Jennifer and their families. A Celebration of her Life was held in the East Chapel of the Rockhampton Crematorium on Thursday 3 July 2014.

Nea leaves behind numerous friends and colleagues in the Australian Literacy Educators' Association, the International Reading Association and Rotary International communities. A significant aspect of Nea's major contribution to literacy education in Australia and beyond was based in her deep and passionate belief in the role of literacy in all learning and in teachers' interest in improving learning. In her own research and publications she highlighted the importance of focussing on language use in all subjects at all year levels, including the secondary years where the different curriculum areas become increasingly diversified.

Nowhere in her work is Nea's commitment to this more evident than in her work as founding editor of the ALEA journal, Literacy Learning: Secondary Thoughts (now titled Literacy Learning: the Middle Years). The journal had grown from the publications of the Australian Reading Association's Literacy and Learning Secondary Schools Special Interest Group. The first issue of the journal was published in November 1993 and, in her editorial, Nea emphatically acknowledged the contribution teachers in all discipline areas make to literacy development.

Twenty years later, Nea, as invited guest editor of Volume 21, Number 1 of the journal she had founded, referred to her dream that teachers of all subjects would welcome a journal that created an opportunity for them to 'report their efforts to teach students reading strategies that would help them to understand assigned subject texts, and to compose their own written texts as representations of that understanding'. …

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