Academic journal article Planning for Higher Education

Integrating E-Learning to Improve Learning Outcomes: A Proven Way for Teachers to Engage Students and Improve Learning Outcomes Is through the Appropriate Use of E-Learning and Web 2.0 Tools in Teaching

Academic journal article Planning for Higher Education

Integrating E-Learning to Improve Learning Outcomes: A Proven Way for Teachers to Engage Students and Improve Learning Outcomes Is through the Appropriate Use of E-Learning and Web 2.0 Tools in Teaching

Article excerpt

THE BEST LEARNING HAPPENS WHEN STUDENTS ARE ENGAGED and everyone participates. The challenges facing educators go beyond course content. Instruction must be culturally responsive to support the achievement of a diverse population. Instructors need to facilitate understanding using a framework that meets every student's level of learning within the affective, cognitive, and psychomotor domains so that each reaches a higher form of creativity and innovation. A proven way for teachers to engage students and improve learning outcomes is through the appropriate use of e-learning and Web 2.0 tools in teaching. The literature supports the case for incorporating technology into teaching to improve learning in the medical field.

The future of medical education needs to include e-learning resources to interest technologically advanced students and encourage learner-centered responsibility and accountability. To inspire learning, the curriculum must meet the needs of today's students. Colleges that pride themselves on being leaders in delivering the best, most educated, students in the medical field must continue to set themselves apart from other institutions by offering state-of-the-art education supported by emerging digital technologies.

It is not challenging to find information using the Internet. A great deal has been published about the future of medical education, the current and future state of international medical education, and the importance of keeping learning central when integrating emerging technologies.

The literature regarding the incorporation of Web 2.0 technologies in medical imaging education is extensive. This vast amount of information can be gathered and grouped into a cohesive review that supports the case for using e-resources to achieve better learning outcomes in the medical sciences.

Learning the theories involved in medical imaging is complex. For example, students of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are required to learn the physics principles behind the creation of optimal diagnostic images. Historically, the teaching methods used included assigned readings supported by lectured PowerPoint presentations (Hoegerl and John 2010). Unfortunately, this model of learning does not meet the needs of every student. There are distinct differences in how students and teachers engage in the educational process (Guri-Rosenblit 2001). Teachers expect students to come prepared for the lecture by reading the assignment in advance. Students attend the lecture without any preparation and expect to learn the material only during the class period. The same can be true for online teaching, with the added concerns of distance education: accountability, instructional quality, technical issues, motivation, and isolation (Westbrook 2012).

Current higher education trends are leading to the adoption of a different academic culture. To increase student understanding, the curriculum must be learner-centered, engaging, and interactive (Guri-Rosenblit 2001). Implementing educational programming that increases the interactivity of and engagement with the learning process by using problem-based activities promotes an increase in understanding (Davis and Davis 2010). Integrating technology in learning is intended to help students form meaningful connections with the content and improve their knowledge and retention of the material (Davis and Davis 2010). New technologies are stimulating change in the development and delivery of both conventional and distance teaching. These new technologies in e-learning include blogs, discussion boards, chat rooms, e-mails, Twitter, Wikis, game-based learning, virtual learning environments, and a variety of other Internet-based Web 2.0 utilities (Hoegerl and John 2010). Research shows that universities are using these applications in a push toward globalization: enrolling more international students, building inter-institutional partnerships, and offering distance education (Guri-Rosenblit 2001). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.