Academic journal article Afterimage

Open Standards and the Digital Age: History, Ideology, and Networks

Academic journal article Afterimage

Open Standards and the Digital Age: History, Ideology, and Networks

Article excerpt

Open source, open network, open systems: the ubiquitous term "open" is central to digital culture. In Open Standards and the Digital Age: History, Ideology, and Networks, Andrew L. Russell offers an historical account of the "open" that uncovers the foundations of open systems and puts those systems into context. By rejecting conventional teleological accounts of the relationship between technology and society, Russell positions his historical study as a work of criticism that traces both ideological shifts and material developments in information and communication technologies (ICT). Russell locates the development of open systems within midcentury ICT engineers' championing of Western modernity by emphasizing the way that their collective labor implicitly and explicitly rejected isolationism, fascism, and repression. The resulting history identifies moments when our cultural and technological episteme shifted in response to critical disruptions and "collective acts of recomposition and invention" (5) by ICT engineers in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. By identifying these shifts and the networks of people, innovations, and material developments that they created, Russell's work opens space for reading the establishment of standards and systems as a critique of centralized control. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.